The unease of a review

While cleaning up my inbox, I noticed that the most recent issue of Feminist Theology carries a review of Reading the Magnificat in Australia: Unsettling Engagements. Very grateful to have a review from Lisa Isherwood that recognises the unsettled and unsettling nature of the work. A bit uneasy about one comment that seems counter to what I was trying to say, about the relative age of the cultural traditions behind the biblical Magnificat and First Nations cultures, so perhaps my writing was unclear. I make the point that First Nations’ songs predate the Magnificat which arrives with the colonisers. And this is a key point. If I were to consider the traditions behind the Magnificat as of a comparable age, it may be through seeing human songs as indebted to older more-than-human songs (which I discuss in chapter 5), though perhaps there are ancient Middle Eastern and European women’s traditions that I don’t discuss that could be adduced. Isherwood notes aptly the problematics of a white settler writer saying anything about the reception of a colonial text in the ongoing colonial space in which I am situated as an inheritor of white privilege, and says: ‘I imagine Elvey wants the reader to be aware of the difficulties and to constantly question her own understandings.’ This is true. At the end of her review, I note with appreciation, she describes the book as ‘a magnificent journey’, and says, ‘Elvey wants us to listen again to an ancient text and by doing so, to open ourselves to a situated but unsettled praxis.’ Yes.

Recent Work Reading 13 September 2021 – online

I hope all of you who are in lockdown in the eastern states are doing ok.

Jennifer Compton and I were scheduled to read in person in Canberra in June this year, from our new poetry collections out from Recent Work Press, but one of the earlier Melbourne lockdowns put that on hold until September. Now due to lockdowns in ACT and Vic, that event is online. 

See the Facebook Event page for details: https://fb.me/e/eetNJiR7u

Details: Monday 13 September 2021, 7pm (Australian Eastern Standard Time). 

Introducing sun glint drift

sun glint drift is the website of Anne Elvey

Of English, Irish and Scottish settler descent, I live and work on Boonwurrung Country (alternatively spelt Boon Wurrung or Bunurong Country) in what is also known as Seaford, Victoria. I pay my respects to the elders past, present and future and recognise their continuing relation to and care for Country. I acknowledge that their sovereignty over these lands and waters has never been ceded.


‘sun glint drift’ was the title of a poem published in the Red Room Writing Water project. It is also the title I give this blog about my poetry and research.

IMG_1093I am a poet, editor and researcher with interests in ecological poetics, ecological feminist hermeneutics, ecological criticism, the material turn,  counter-colonial and decolonising ecological ethics, creative research practices, poetry and biblical literature.

My poetry publications include, Obligations of Voice (Recent Work Press 2021), On arrivals of breath (Poetica Christi 2019), White on White (Cordite Books 2018), and Kin (FIP 2014), shortlisted in the New South Wales Premier’s Literary Awards 2015.

In 2017-2018 I edited hope for whole: poets speak up to Adani.

My most recent scholarly book is Reading the Magnificat in Australia: Unsettling Engagements (Sheffield Phoenix 2020).

I was inaugural managing editor of Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics from 2013 to 2020.

Dr Anne Elvey

La Mama Poetica online – still available to view

The video of La Mama Poetica Online from 20 October 2020 is still available to view for a donation (of any amount) via this link.

I have been enjoying reading recent books by my co-readers from last night’s La Mama Poetics online: Jocelyn Deane, Anisa Nandaula and David Stavanger.

A particular highlight is David Stavanger’s sequence ‘Dog Minding’.

For me, Anisa Nandaula’s embodied performance and/as poetics is clear and persuasive.

I am finding Jocelyn Deane’s shifts of perspective on popular culture, classics and biblical themes to be highly engaging.

La Mama Poetica online – Tuesday 20 October 2020 – 7.30pm

Looking forward to participating in this event coming up on Tuesday along with David Stavanger, Anisa Nandaula, and Jocelyn Deane.

This online event will have a live Q&A at the end of all poets performances.

 

The event is ticketed.

 

Details here:


Bookings via this link

Announcement and Call for Expressions of Interest

Plumwood Mountain: An Australian Journal of Ecopoetry and Ecopoetics is in a time of transition. After 7 years, Managing Editor Anne Elvey will be stepping down at the end of 2020. At the same time the Editorial Board intends to deepen its commitments to decentring or deemphasising the human in ecopoetics while holding this vision in a wider frame of cultural responsibility both in  Australia and internationally. As part of our continuing affirmation of more-than-human agencies, of intersections between environmental activism and cultures of poetry, and of the complex entanglements of race, gender, sexuality, location and class in an emerging ecopoetics, the journal wants to expand its editorial board to reflect these commitments. As part of this development, the new Managing Editor has the option to find a new name for the journal.

Expressions of interest are called for a Managing Editor and Editorial Administration Team that would with an Editorial Board shape the future of the journal and undertake the tasks of bringing it to publication. These are voluntary positions.

Further details: https://plumwoodmountain.com/2020/07/23/managing-editor-and-editorial-administration-team-call-for-expressions-of-interest/

Poetry Reading 17 March 2020

I was to read as one of four featured poets at La Mama Poetica this evening. The three co-featuring poets were to be David Stavanger, Anisa Nandaula and Jocelyn Deane. I was looking forward to the event, as I suspect were all four of us. But I am relieved that, wisely, La Mama cancelled the event, with the hope that this is a postponement to a better time. The decision was made to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in Australia. In solidarity, I have made this recording of poems I might have read tonight. My thanks to Amanda Anastasi for the invitation to read at La Mama.

The poems I read in this video are titled:

‘Night Gusts with House and Flowering Gum’, forthcoming in Island

‘Things fall away’ published in Overland

‘Called up’ published in Not Very Quiet

‘Prelude to a voice’ published in my collection White on White (Cordite Books, 2018), available from the author (afelvey@gmail.com) or Cordite Publishing

‘Cinders’ published in my collection Kin (Five Islands Press, 2014) available from the author (afelvey@gmail.com)

‘The sense is porous to the thing’ published in my collection On arrivals of breath (Poetica Christi Press, 2019) available from the author (afelvey@gmail.com) or from Poetica Christi Press

‘Earth Interview in the Anthropocene’ published in Rabbit and hope for whole: Poets speak up to Adani

‘Grasp’ forthcoming in Verity La

David Stavanger’s new book Case Notes is available from UWAP

Anisa Nandaula’s Melanin Garden is available from Anita Nandaula

Jocelyn Deane’s The Second Person is available from Girls on Key